DKTK Core Facilities: Proteomics

© iStockphoto.com/ aleksandarvelasevic

© iStockphoto.com/ aleksandarvelasevic

Proteomics Facility München

The Core Facility Proteomics at the DKTK Partner site comprises five high-end mass spectrometers, several liquid chromatography systems and terabyte scale computing infrastructure.

The range of supported applications span quantitative protein expression profiling of human and animal tissues, tumors, cell lines and body fluids, dynamic analysis of post-translational modifications, protein-protein interactions, drug target identification, drug mechanism of action analysis and many more. We can offer discovery type proteomic experiments using multidimensional chromatography coupled to the latest Orbitrap technology as well as targeted assays using parallel reaction monitoring. All major quantification workflows are established in the laboratory including SILAC, TMT and a range of label-free analysis. We typically work on the basis of scientific collaboration in which we engage our expertise along the entire path from experiment design through to data acquisition and bioinformatic analysis.

Contact

Prof Dr Bernhard Küster
Chair of Proteomics and Bioanalytics
Technische Universität München
Partner Site of the German Cancer Consortium
Emil Erlenmeyer Forum 5
85354 Freising
Germany

kuster(at)tum.de

Proteomics Core Facility Frankfurt

The Proteomics Core Facility at the Frankfurt location is an initiative of the DKTK and is equipped with three Q Exactive mass spectrometers from Thermo Fisher (one Q Exactive, one Q Exactive Plus and one Q Exactive HF instrument). The available technology can be used to e.g. identify and quantify protein expression patterns, post-translational protein modifications such as phosphorylation, acetylation and ubiquitination, and protein complexes.

This makes it possible to conduct a comprehensive characterisation of oncogenic mechanisms at the protein level, which includes mapping of oncogenic signal transduction processes. The technical advances made in recent years mean that it is now possible to identify and quantify in relative terms several thousand proteins from just a few micrograms of protein. The main activities of the Proteomics Core Facility relate to translational research topics in the field of acute leukaemia, lymphoma, lung cancer, rectal cancer and brain tumours. The research uses cell culture models and freshly isolated tumour cells, as well as fresh frozen and formalin-fixed tissue samples. All the procedures necessary for sample preparation are established at the Proteomics Core Facility and are available to users. For the relative quantification of protein samples, the methods available include stable isotope labelling (SILAC), iTRAQ and label-free methods. Absolute protein quantification is also possible. Besides biochemical analysis, the Proteomics Core Facility is also used to conduct bioinformatic analyses of mass spectrometry data, making it possible to provide DKTK scientists with complex datasets once the data has been suitably processed.

Contact

Dr med Thomas Oellerich
University Hospital Frankfurt
Department of Medicine II, Haematology/Oncology

thomas.oellerich(at)kgu.de

Cancer Metabolomics Platform Berlin

The metabolome reflects the current functional status of the cell. Metabolomic changes play a central role in the pathogenesis and therapy of malignant diseases. The at the DKTK partner site Berlin established gas chromatography, coupled with high resolution mass spectrometry (GC-MS), is a sensitive and robust platform for the analysis of metabolites of the primary metabolism (amino acids, sugars, nucleic acids) (Fig. 2). This technique offers a broad applicability in tumor biology and interdisciplinary problems. The MS technology (APCI Q-TOF) allows quantitative statements and is particularly suitable for the elucidation of the structure of unknown analytes and for the analysis of very small samples volumes. Metabolic flux analysis is currently under establishment. As increasingly important extension of other, in Berlin reproached omics platforms, the cancer metabolomics platform enables functional, systems biology insights into the tumor metabolism and contributes to the identification of novel therapeutic principles.

Contact

Dr Jan Lisec
030 450 559 123

jan.Lisec(at)Charite.de

Prof Dr Clemens Schmitt
030 450 559 123

jan.Lisec(at)Charite.de

Genomics and Proteomics Core Facility Heidelberg

The DKFZ Genomics and Proteomics Core Facility (GPCF) is a central research infrastructure providing DKTK members access to sophisticated key technologies that serve the need of biomedical science and offering high quality solutions at reasonable costs. Trained and dedicated personnel ensure highest quality and reproducibility of our services.

The GPCF technology portfolio mostly covers the following areas:

  • The proteomics part provides technologies to analyze proteins, protein modifications and small molecules covering mass spectrometry and NMR for qualitative and quantitative analysis.
  • In the field of functional genomics the GPCF generates monoclonal antibodies on demand, some of which are by now used in diagnostics. Isogenic cell lines stably expressing recombinant proteins or shRNAs from a particular genomic locus are generated e.g., to assess phenotypes of proteins and mutants in in vitro as well as in vivo systems, e.g., in xenograft mouse models.
  • The genomics part of the facility operates one of Europe’s largest next-generation sequencing units offering Illumina HiSeq and MiSeq technologies, and the latest Illumina Hi-Seq X-Ten platform which was funded by DKTK. GPCF performs sequencing within several national and international cancer genome projects (e.g. International Cancer Genome Consortium, INFORM, DKTK), in addition to a variety of individual in-house projects. Gene and miRNA expression profiling, genotyping and methylation analysis is carried out using array-based technologies.
  • The GPCF HUSAR unit offers bioinformatics support, in particular sequence analysis ranging from traditional analysis (like alignments, sequence annotation, structure analysis, etc.) to the analysis of deep-sequencing experiments (genomic sequencing, smallRNA, ChIP-seq, etc.).

The central infrastructure of the GPCF offers assisted access to costly instruments, and distributes the human ORF clone resource of the international ORFeome Collaboration for recombinant expression of encoded proteins, e.g., in isogenic cell lines.

Our mission is to always enable application of state-of-the-art technologies and to offer high quality solutions. We carry out joint projects with scientific groups within DKFZ to implement the latest technologies that serve the needs of science. In addition to providing full or assisted access to services, we are involved in the DKFZ teaching program, and organize tech-talks, seminars and practical courses where we inform interested scientists, predocs and technicians on the technological background of applications.


GPCF Homepage: www.dkfz.de/gpcf

Prof Stefan Wiemann
Head of GPCF
+49 6221 424700

s.wiemann(at)dkfz.de

Dr Maike Brück
GPCF Coordinator
+49 6221 424734

m.brueck(at)dkfz.de

Prof Ilse Hofmann
Antibodies
+49 6221 423351

i.hofmann(at)dkfz.de

Dr Stephan Wolf
Ultra-deep sequencing
+49 6221 423409

s.wolf(at)dkfz-heidelberg.de

Dr Melanie Bewerunge-Hudler
Microarray technologies
+49 6221 424733

m.hudler(at)dkfz-heidelberg.de

Dr Martina Schnölzer
Protein Analysis
+49 6221 422723

m.schnoelzer(at)dkfz-heidelberg.de

Karl-Heinz Glatting
HUSAR bioinformatics
+49 6221 422334

genome(at)dkfz.de